Category Archives: News and Tips

By the Light of the Silvery Moon

Although gardeners often dream of sun-splashed borders filled with stately perennials, many are discovering that their daisies, daylilies, and daffodils are working overtime, bringing the garden to light…at night! Welcome to the world of the garden after dark.

With busy families finding fewer daylight hours to enjoy their gardens, it makes perfect sense to create a moonlight retreat in which family and friends can gather after hours. Spending balmy evenings out-of-doors is a wonderful luxury after the chill of winter…and during the scorching days of summer, the relative cool of the nighttime garden will come as a welcome respite. For the romantic at heart, few things are more enchanting than a midnight stroll through flowers kissed by moonlight.

How do you begin to create such a paradise? The secret is to select white and pale-colored plants that shimmer in the night. You’ll find that many of your favorite flowers, which you thought only bloomed in blue or hot pink, have been hybridized for white color or a very pale interpretation of their darker counterparts. Annuals like petunias, impatiens, and snapdragons all have white cousins, along with perennials, such as echinacea (coneflower) and campanula. You may also be surprised to learn at what time of day many flowers open. While some, like daylilies, as the name suggests, actually close at nightfall, others, such as evening primrose and moonflower, with its lemony scent, come alive right along with the peepers and crickets.

Just like any other garden, the moonlit garden should be filled with plants of different heights and habits, shapes and textures. Plants with variegated or white-edged foliage like euonymus, ivy, and hosta, add contrast to the garden and will sparkle in the dim light just like the flowers. Shrubs like spirea provide a backdrop for lower-growing plants like cosmos and artemisia, while a well-placed trellis or fence can lend support to lacy curtains of clematis and passionflower. A bench beneath an arbor brimming with white wisteria and climbing roses or a garden swing flanked by fragrant lilac or mock orange is an intoxicating spot to while away an evening. You’ll find that the strong fragrance will not only attract hopeless romantics, but also the “butterflies of the night,” moths, which will flit and flutter throughout the moonlit garden feeding on sweet nectar. Special touches complete the scene: A serpentine path lined with phlox, baby’s breath, and lilies, will invite a leisurely stroll, and a rustic lantern will allow you to enjoy your garden even on those nights when the moon is hidden by clouds.

A warm summer’s night, a trickle of water from a nearby fountain, and some soothing music from a speaker hidden beneath a shrub–the stage is set for spending a relaxing evening with friends and family in the magical land of the midnight garden.

Hydrangea Care Questions and Answers

My hydrangea grows beautiful green leaves, but I haven’t seen any blooms yet. How do I get my hydrangea to bloom?

There are a few main reasons that you may not see blooms on your hydrangea bushes: sun exposure, over-watering and over-fertilizing. Endless Summer® hydrangeas prefer morning sun and afternoon dappled shade. If they are planted in full sun, it may be too hot and intense for the blooms to produce. Also, over-watering and over-fertilizing your plants can inhibit bloom production. Hydrangeas prefer moist, but not wet soil, and one application of fertilizer in spring or early summer. For additional planting and care tips, please click here.


I pruned my hydrangeas back after an early frost and now I am not seeing blooms. Why is that?
How to prune hydrangeas is a great question. If you pruned your hydrangeas back to the base, it will take some time for the new growth to develop and produce blooms. Be patient and look for the green growth coming up from the base of the plants. That is where your new blooms will grow from!


I had several small blooms on my hydrangeas last year, so this year I have fertilized every 10 days until I saw blooms starting to develop. What else should I be doing to get big blooms?
The first rule of thumb is to NOT over-fertilize your hydrangea plants. We suggest one application of granular fertilizer in spring or early summer, and then follow package instructions afterwards. If you over-fertilize, it can burn the root system of your hydrangea bushes and actually inhibit bloom production. For more tips on fertilizer and how to achieve big, beautiful blooms, please click here.


My hydrangeas have brown dry spots on the leaves and brown petals on the bloom. What do I need to do to make the hydrangeas healthier?
If the spot is round and brown with a red to purple ring, you likely have Anthracnose. Remove the affected leaves and dispose away from your plants. Treat with a fungicide and repeat as necessary. If the margins of the leaves fade from green to grey and then turn brown, the plants were dry for too long. If the petals of the flowers turn brown at the tip, not enough water was applied. Both the leaves and the flowers will show lack of water very quickly.


I planted my hydrangeas in a location with at least 6 hours of full sun and partial afternoon shade. I read online that hydrangeas prefer that I water them heavily once a week instead of a little water every day. Now my hydrangea bushes are turning brown with no blooms. What am I doing wrong?
Depending on where in the United States you live will determine how much sun your hydrangeas can handle. If you are in a northern state (Zones 4 – 5b), your hydrangeas can handle up to 6 hours of sun in the morning, but as you get further south you should allow for more shade on your plants. In the southern-most regions (Zones 8 – 9), we recommend a maximum of 2 hours of morning sun. Too much sun exposure can cause your hydrangea shrubs to burn on its leaves and blooms. Also, be sure to put your fingers in the soil to see if it needs watering. We do recommend a soak versus light watering each day, but you should be sure that the soil is always moist – not wet – by sticking your fingers in the dirt. If it is dry, give it a good soaking. If it is wet, do not add water. For more information on where to plant and how to water, please click here.


Do these hydrangea plants survive in containers? Our garden gets really hot, so I think a container would be a better option. Do I follow the same care instructions (watering, fertilizing, etc.) as I would in the garden?
Absolutely! Hydrangea shrubs are perfect as potted plants and give you the ability to move the hydrangeas to different locations and create a focal point in your living space. The care instructions are mainly the same, with a few notable differences. For a complete look at container care, click here.


What type of fertilizer do you recommend? I know that hydrangea bushes do best with certain kinds of fertilizer because of their big blooms, but am not sure what to buy!
We recommend a granular, slow-release fertilizer with a NPK ratio of 10-30-10. If you cannot find that specific ratio, ask your local nursery for a fertilizer with a high concentration of phosphorus, as that encourages the bloom growth. For more information, please click here


I bought these plants because I wanted big, beautiful blue hydrangea bush in my garden. I got big blooms, but they are PINK! What did I do wrong?
The pH level of your soil determines hydrangea colors. If you have a pink hydrangea and you want a blue hydrangea, no problem! Pink blooms develop in alkaline soil, so certain amendments need to be made to lower the pH and create an acidic soil situation. We suggest Color Me Blue soil sulfur to encourage blue bloom production. This is safe, organic and all-natural. There are also other natural remedies to changing hydrangea colors. To encourage blue blooms in alkaline soils, add aluminum sulfate, composted oak leaves, pine needles or coffee grounds. There are more tips, including how to change from blue blooms to pink hydrangea, click here.


I planted my Endless Summer hydrangea in an area that is far too sunny and hot, so I’d like to transplant them to a more shaded area. What is the best time of year to do this, and are there any other tips I should know?
If you are transplanting your hydrangea bushes, we recommend doing so while it is dormant.That means transplanting your hydrangea shrubs in late fall, after the first frost, or in early spring before it has woken up for the summer.


I live in an area that gets a lot of snow during the winter. Should I prune Endless Summer Hydrangeas back like I do with my other hydrangea bushes? What else should I do to protect them from the freezing winter months?
The great thing about Endless Summer® hydrangeas is that you don’t need to prune them back to the base like other hydrangeas. Since they bloom on previous years’ growth AND the new season’s growth, you can leave them all winter long to achieve double the blooms next spring. Do NOT prune the hydrangea back in fall. Leaving the fall blooms on your plants over the winter provides winter interest, and ensures you aren’t removing buds that will become flowers in the spring and summer. Leaves, wood mulch and/or straw are good options to insulate your plants. Mound the mulch or leaves around your plants at least 12” high to protect the flower buds that will bloom early next year. For more Overwintering tips, please click here. If your hydrangeas are planted in containers, please click here.

Information courtesy of Endless Summer Hydrangea. Visit website >

Get Beautiful Garden Color Fast!

You’ve decided to add color to your garden. And you’d like to do it now. But where to begin?

A good first step in choosing a garden’s color palette is to establish mood and emotion. Do you envision it as a serene and peaceful haven, where you and your family can be rejuvenated and unwind? Or does a lively and energizing space for entertaining and outdoor activities have more appeal? Do your tastes lean to the traditional, or are you more attracted to modern, trendy environments? Whatever you see as your ideal garden space, give initial attention to how you want yourself and others to feel when they are in it. You can create a desired emotional response just with color! Hot hues – reds, oranges and yellows – are dramatic, stimulating and energizing, and lift the spirits on cloudy days. Cool tones – blues, aquas, greens and purples, as well as most pastels – are soothing and relaxing.

Next, use an artist’s color wheel to help you decide on a scheme: monochromatic (based on a single color), harmonious (based on colors adjacent on the wheel, such as yellow and orange or blue and violet), or complimentary (based on contrasting colors, such as blue and orange, red and green). 

Of course, researching appropriate plants, purchasing them, planting and growing all take time, and it may be months or even a year before your vision becomes a reality. But there’s no need to wait to introduce desired colors into your landscape. Here are three proven ways to get color in an instant:

Mix it up! Use plenty of different sized containers filled with annuals in your chosen colors for fast, easy and moveable bursts of color. Just as you can quickly change or improve the look of an interior with throw pillows, cushions and slip covers, you can also rapidly color up your outdoor space by utilizing pots and planters of bright and cheery annuals. Fill up a variety of planters with pleasing combinations of these abundant bloomers and place strategically where you most need and want color. You may find such a perfect combination for a given area, that you’ll feel confident in permanently placing perennials and shrubs in the location in similar color combinations.

Use garden decor for lively bursts of color! Plants and flowers are the obvious and first choice of color for the gardener. But garden decor should be included in any comprehensive plan in order to echo and enhance the natural plantings, to create a counterpoint of complimentary color or even to brighten up an otherwise dark corner. Brightly-hued and decorated metal sculptures, mosaic stepping stones, enamel ornaments, ceramic bird baths, tiled fountains, painted planters and decorated bird feeders and houses can be vital elements in any garden color scheme. And they have the added benefit of remaining colorful throughout the winter months. Use them as focal points on patios, hang them from arches or tuck them among lush beds of flowering plants. 

Furnish with style! Garden benches, patio sets, chairs, chaises, tables and stools are available in a full spectrum of colors and motifs. How about a purple Adirondack chair made out of recycled materials for an instant jolt of joyful color? Or an antiqued blue rustic iron bistro table with matching chairs? Weatherproof fabrics are another colorful option for outdoor cushions and cloths.

Whatever mood you want to create in your garden, you can create it fast with color!

Three Myths About Organic Gardening

You hear the words in the media, you see the products in the stores and you may even know a neighbor who practices it.

But what exactly is organic gardening?

Simply put, it means using only fertilizers or pesticides that are strictly of animal or vegetable, and not synthetic or chemical, origin.

And, although the term organic gardening has recently become a trendy buzzword, in fact, it is a concept and practice that has been in use since cultivation of land first began thousands of years ago. It is, essentially, the way it has always been done.

It was only when scientists in the mid-1800s began developing chemical fertilizers and pesticides that the collective mindset shifted toward accelerated growth of crops, more thorough and faster destruction of pests and weeds, and an increasing disregard for the environment.

But that trend is turning back, with numerous benefits, for agriculture and for the individual.

The average homeowner, with lawns and flower gardens to maintain, may feel mystified as to how or why he should implement organic practices, hindered in part by common misconceptions that have arisen:

Organic gardening is time consuming. In truth, organic methods needn’t take any more out of a busy schedule than non-organic methods. It may require a bit of research into the best products and techniques to use for a given set of problems, whether it be weeds, insect pests or just keeping a lawn bright green. But once established, an organic maintenance routine can be fast and efficient. Returning an environment to a more natural state can, before long, require less care and attention.

Organic gardening is expensive. As it has and continues to become more mainstream, the number of excellent organic products available has increased to offer a wide range of choices in soil enrichment, weed and moss control, and insecticides. More competition in the marketplace results in lower costs. But, in honesty, what price can be put on eliminating chemicals from one’s environment that are known to be harmful to the health and welfare of humans, pets and wildlife?

Organic gardening won’t make much difference. Perhaps results won’t be apparent at first, but breaking the synthetic and chemical gardening product habit brings a wealth of positive results. Switch to organic lawn care and soon see an increase in the number of songbirds stopping by, feeding and possibly nesting. The organic gardening concept also encourages introducing more native plants into the garden, which provide food sources for other wildlife, such as bees and butterflies and amphibians. Improving soil conditions, contributing to a safer water supply and the sense of satisfaction in living more responsibly toward the environment and mankind are all benefits to the individual who makes the commitment to garden organically.

A turning back toward organic gardening is as much philosophical as practical. It embraces ideals of simple living, healthy choices and a closeness to nature. And those are three truths everyone can benefit from.

Where to start? Your local garden center or nursery is a perfect place, where professionals familiar with organic materials and methods will gladly assist you to choose products to suit your needs. Just tell them you are ready to “go organic!”

The Elements of Texture in the Garden

Understanding the possibilities.

Garden designers are known to focus on texture as a key feature in aesthetically pleasing outdoor spaces. Texture is an element that may not be as obvious as color or structure, but it is a vital component that would be much missed if neglected in planning and creating a home or public garden.

The word texture comes from the Latin texere meaning to weave. In gardening, it applies usually to the surface characteristics of a given plant but can also describe the overall impression or feel of a plant grouping, area or an entire landscape.

How all the different parts of a garden relate to one another and create a harmonious, unified and interesting whole depends a great deal on the use of texture. The play of light across a series of plantings will accentuate different textures at different times of the day and in different weather conditions. Breezes affect plant movement and should be taken into account when positioning trees, shrubs and plants to take advantage of it.

What are some of the ways that texture can be introduced into the garden? One of the easiest is by a careful consideration of plant foliage and structure. Even a monochromatic garden scheme can be alive and exciting simply by clever variations of foliage, shape and structure.

Consider the following when purchasing and placing plants or creating plant combinations. Remember that contrast equals interest.

Density. Is the plant’s shape open and light? Or condensed and closed. Is the foliage fine or course? Very dense foliage can overpower a finely foliated plant if careful attention is not paid to proportion and scale. Does the plant look airy and show its background behind it, or does it present a solid facade, with no light coming through? Ferns are primarily floaty and feathery, while hedging plants such as laurels are used to create barriers.

Structure. It is tightly branched? Bunched together? Or billowy and graceful?

Movement. Are there aspects of the plant that are fluid and graceful, that change in a breeze or wind, or does it remain rigid and firm?

Shape. Analyze the shape of the leaves. Are they mostly round, oval or heart-shaped. Are they pointy, such as the needles of evergreens or the spiky fronds of cordyline? Instant contrast can be achieved through combining plants with dramatically different leaf shapes, even if they are similar shades of green.

Surface texture. Is it fuzzy, smooth, hard, bumpy, rubbery, waxy, hairy or heavily veined? Light striking smooth surfaces is reflected differently than rougher surfaces. Fuzzy plants, such as Lamb’s Ears, soften an area and invite closer inspection and touching. The glossy, smooth surface of succulent leaves are also highly attractive, but for different reasons. Don’t overlook the tactile qualities of the plant. Peeling bark is another element that adds interest and creates beautiful patterns in a variety of lighting situations.

Height. At maturity, will the plant remain short, or continue to gain height each year without proper pruning?

Evergreen or deciduous. Evergreens provide a stable texture, whereas deciduous plants, trees and shrubs provide seasonal variations. Even bare branches are an important textural element to consider.

Understanding these few basics will enable even beginning gardeners to successfully employ texture in their environment. A visit to a local nursery, where it is convenient to place pots of differently textured plants next to each other on a large cart, is an easy first step in experimenting with different plant combinations.